OCDiabetic

Low carb living with type 1 diabetes

Hooked

Variety encourages eating. People eat significantly more if you hand them a bowl with ten rather than just six colors of M&M’s. If you give them a plate of spaghetti, they eat a certain amount and stop, but if you then present them with more pasta in a different shape, such as tortellini, they eat…
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Insulin shock therapy

I just finished reading The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath, which follows a woman’s descent into madness. While in the asylum, the main character receives insulin shock therapy, a commonly used psychiatric treatment in the 1960s when Plath wrote the novel. It was the preferred method for dealing with schizophrenia, and a famous case is…
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The man who invented instant ramen

Instant noodle inventor Momofuku Ando loved golf so much that he dreamed of dying on the golf course. When he passed away in 2007, the number eighty-six billion circulated in his obituaries. That was the number of servings of instant noodles we consumed on earth the previous year. It comes to nearly twelve bowls for…
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Blue Zones

Ikaria in Greece is sometimes described as the place where people forget to die. Like the other blue zones, the island has more centenarians than anywhere else in the world. According to explorer Dan Buettner, who first set out on a quest in 2000 to identify places where people lived longer, there are five such…
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The Open Insulin Project

When Frederick Banting discovered insulin in 1921, he refused to put his name on the patent. He felt it was unethical for a doctor to profit from a discovery that saved lives. Co-inventors James Collip and Charles Best later sold the insulin patent to the University of Toronto for just $1, as Banting proclaimed that…
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Diabetic support

The other night I had drinks with my friend and his girlfriend. She’s Scottish and has the laudable goal of wanting to help people in her disenfranchised community. One of her best friends is a diabetic in her twenties who doesn’t know what food looks like unless it comes out of a tin. She’s a…
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Nature’s candy

I ran into my old boss yesterday, and we got chatting over a coffee. Diabetes came up, and she told me her sister has the type where you don’t have to inject insulin, and her doctor had told her it was much better to have fruit instead of things with actual sugar. I told her…
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The physiology of taste

Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarins book from 1825 is famous for the aphorism “Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you what you are.” He believed that food defined the nation. Perhaps less known is that he’s one of the earliest proponents of a low carbohydrate diet for weight loss. He recites a dialogue when dining with the stout…
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Why we age – and why we don’t have to

When it comes to aging, people aren’t afraid of losing their lives. They’re afraid of losing their humanity. Most google-savvy diabetics know the statistic that diabetes takes a decade of your life away. For well-controlled diabetes, it is not a must, but the five-year mortality rate for a diabetic foot ulcer is higher than fifty…
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The law of small numbers

What should be a foundation in diabetes treatment is barely known by anyone who hasn’t read Richard Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution. It’s a shame. The law of small numbers states that the lower the carbs, the smaller the insulin doses, so the smaller the errors. By eating a low-carb diet, you can avoid the roller coaster…
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